Wasted Labor

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What follows is a tale of wasted time.

The pattern is 22-around. 1 repeat of the pattern is 176 beads.
It took me 5 minutes 30 seconds to string 1 repeat when I counted the beads after each row of 22 beads.
I strung 40 repeats.
5.3 x 40 = 212 = 3 hours and 53 minutes of stringing.
1 strung repeat of the pattern measures 26 cm.
26 x 40 = 1040 = 10 meters and 40 centimeters of beads.
I crocheted 37 repeats.
1 crocheted repeat of the pattern took about 23 minutes to complete assuming no mistakes or stopping to scoot the beads down the thread.
23 x 37 = 851 = 14 hours and 18 minutes.
The finished rope is 53 cm long. It has 6512 beads and 100 m of thread.

Of course it took a lot longer than 14 hours to complete because mistakes were made but the biggest time sink was scooting the beads down.
It was a huge mistake to string all the beads at once. Pushing back 10 meters of beads is a lot of work. The thread will twist and you end up spending 10 minutes to untangle the thread before you can scoot the next section of beads down. Not fun.
Mistake number 2 was using black thread. It made it hard to see and separate the stitches. Luckily I have my daylight lamp that helped me see in the beginning of the rope.
Mistake number 3 was using a size 0.75mm crochet hook. The first 2 repeats of the rope were a real struggle before I realized that I needed to switch to a bigger hook. That part became very stiff as a result but since it was only at the beginning of the rope I decided to leave it and continue crocheting with a bigger hook. The rest of the rope is firm but flexible.

And now for the biggest mistake of them all. The whole rope is a mistake!

I don’t know why I didn’t notice this but I guess I didn’t have a clear memory of what the rope was supposed to look like.
After I added the snap button closure (that didn’t work out by the way) I for some reason went back and looked at Birgitte’s necklace and that’s when I noticed that my rope didn’t look like that.
I actually liked my rope until I noticed that it was all wrong. It turned into a “new” pattern and it’s not ugly, it’s just a bit busy. But now all I see is a mistake so I will undo it and start over.
Michael thinks I’m crazy but I made this necklace for myself and I’m not going to walk around with a mistake around my neck.

I had started my rope with a few rounds of crochet without beads so I figured the mistake was in the number of stitches. I strung 1 repeat of the pattern to figure out what I had done wrong, this time starting directly with the beads. So I chained 22 beads and joined the last bead to the first with a slip stitch. That’s not how you do it. The pattern did not line up correctly.
So I tried again, this time joining the last and first bead with bead 23. And that’s how you do it apparently because this time the pattern lined up.
So I guess I had 1 too many stitches in my starting round.
I’m so disappointed in myself. I had a feeling that something was off while I was working but I didn’t stop to figure out what it was. Everything did line up “correctly” so it seemed. Aargh! What a waste of time!
I’ll be happy once it has been destroyed and I can start over again.

The pattern is by Birgitte Iländer and, when done correctly, is called Folk. I will write a proper post about this when I have made the correct necklace.

One thought on “Wasted Labor

  1. Bead crochet is a labor of love. Next time only work with a pattern of 4 or 8 colors only and it will turn out better. Oh, by the way you can mix the sizes of the beads too. Just keep the sizes close like 8 & 10s or 10 & 15s. A tip also is to put markers (tiny triangles of paper) between each repeat in case you screw up. I am a fast crocheter so it didn’t take me long to crochet the bracelet. It just takes a long time to set up the thread with the beads. Good luck.

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